Posts for: March, 2014

By Thompson Lee & Chalothorn
March 18, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
NewMaterialsAreReplacingGoldInTodaysDentalCrowns

A “crown” or a “cap” is the term used to restore a decayed or broken tooth that needs to be completely encased to protect the tooth beneath it. A crown's dual purpose is to restore the tooth's form and function. Decades ago gold was the material of choice for a crown. What we ultimately choose depends on a particular crown's requirements with regard to the tooth's appearance and function, and to some extent what you want.

Gold: Gold crowns last the longest and wear the best (at about the same rate as natural teeth), but they are not used as frequently today, especially if they are visible in a person's smile. Gold crowns are made of cast gold, a technique that has been in use for over a hundred years. They can last for decades, and have been known to last 50 years or more. They tend to cost less per tooth than porcelain or other materials.

All-Porcelain: “All porcelain” crowns have a natural appearance and as technology improves they are gaining popularity. Dental porcelains are composed of ceramic substances that are variations of glass. This gives them their translucent, lifelike appearance — but it makes them brittle and subject to fracture. Therefore all-porcelain crowns may not be a good choice for back teeth because they frequently fail under the biting forces applied during chewing and especially adverse habits like tooth clenching or grinding. Porcelain crowns are made of material that doesn't wear. Consequently, it can cause excessive wear to the teeth they bite against.

Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal (PFM): PFM crowns have been in use for more than 40 years. They combine a substructure of gold or platinum for strength and have porcelain “facings” for the visible surfaces. In some ways they combine the best of both worlds, but they do have some problems; the metal can show through the porcelain, detracting from its life-like appearance. These crowns can have a functional lifespan of about 20 years or more.

New and Future Materials: Newer “pressed-ceramic” restorations and computer-milled ceramics have received good reviews for aesthetics and service. These new materials are being intensively researched. Initial results look good, but we'll have to see how they last over time.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about crowns and other dental restorations. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gold or Porcelain Crowns?


By Thompson Lee & Chalothorn
March 03, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
ChippedTeethHarmoniouslyMadeGoodasNew

“Break a leg” is a well-known theatrical expression for wishing good luck to an actor about to go on stage. Singers should have one of their own…“Chip a tooth”! Apparently collisions between microphones and pearly whites are an occupational hazard for crooners. Taylor Swift became one of the latest casualties during a concert in Pittsburgh while belting out her hit “I Knew You Were Trouble.” The consummate professional, she didn’t miss a beat and kept on singing despite seeing a tooth chip hit the floor.

After all, while chipping a tooth is an inconvenience, it’s not a permanent smile wrecker. Modern dentistry offers several options for restoring a damaged tooth to its original symmetry and luster, or even better!

Bonding
Dental cosmetic bonding is the quickest and lowest-cost option to repair a chip. This involves application of a composite filling material that is colored and shaped to match the original tooth. Bonding material can be used to replace the lost portion of tooth or to seamlessly reattach the lost portion if it has been preserved and is otherwise undamaged. Little to no removal of existing tooth surface is needed.

Veneers
A veneer can be used for slightly larger areas or discolored teeth. This is a thin, custom-made shell placed on the front of the tooth to give it a new “face.” Some removal of existing tooth surface may be necessary to fit a veneer so it is flush with the surfaces of surrounding intact teeth.

Crowns
When a relatively large portion of the tooth is missing, a crown is often the better choice. It fully encases the visible portion of the remaining tooth above the gum line and is shaped and sized to match the original. It can be made of tooth-colored porcelain fused to metal crowns or all-ceramic (optimal for highly visible areas). A small amount of the existing tooth surface will be removed to allow the crown to fit over it.

If you would like more information about repairing a chipped tooth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Artistic Repair of Front Teeth With Composite Resin.”


By Thompson Lee & Chalothorn
March 01, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
FiveFactsAboutPalatalExpanders

Have you heard of palatal expanders? If your child needs orthodontic work, then you ought to hear about them! These small appliances offer plenty of advantages to kids whose smiles, due to a variety of problems, may need some help. Here are five things you should know:

1. Palatal expanders are small orthodontic appliances that fit inside the mouth.

Custom-fabricated for each child, these devices are placed near the roof of the mouth, in between the two rows of upper teeth. They consist of two small metal brackets with a tensioning system that can be adjusted by a tiny key. Not everyone needs one, but they can really benefit kids with certain orthodontic conditions.

2. Palatal expanders take advantage of a child's natural growth processes.

That's part of the reason they work so well. Since the bones of a child's upper jaw don't fuse together until sometime after puberty, it's relatively easy to move them apart before that time. The palatal expander applies gentle pressure to gradually move the left and right halves of the upper jaw apart, over a period of a few months. Then it's left on several weeks longer, allowing new bone to fill in and stabilize the expansion.

3. Palatal expanders are helpful in treating a variety of orthodontic problems.

Crowding — that is, not having enough space in the jaw to accommodate all of the teeth — is one major issue. A related issue is impacted teeth: These are teeth that are blocked from coming in (erupting) by other teeth or jaw structures. A third issue is crossbite: That's when the back top teeth come down to bite inside, rather than outside, the bottom teeth. Gaining additional space in the upper jaw can help relieve all of these problems.

4. Palatal expanders can eliminate the need for tooth extraction.

Once upon a time, extraction was the only way to solve these problems. However it's an invasive (and potentially complex) procedure. A palatal expander can often provide the same — or better — results, via a noninvasive method.

5. Palatal expanders typically shorten overall orthodontic treatment time.

They're generally worn for a total of three to six months, but they can considerably shorten a child's overall orthodontic treatment time. Plus, they're invisible — a big plus to image-conscious teens. Could they benefit your child?

If you have questions about palatal expanders, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Palatal Expanders” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”




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